The Stables Market

The Stables Market is today, one of London’s most popular, cosmopolitan and vibrant of markets. The site lies within the Regent’s Canal Conservation Area and comprises a complex of listed multi-storey former stables buildings originally developed from the mid nineteenth century onwards by the London & North West Railway Company.

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Cenotaph Relocation

The War Memorial Grade II* listed Cenotaph Assmbly was built in 1924 by Sir Edwin Lutyens. The rectangular Cenotaph is located on a plinth which runs out to each side with the returns bearing obelisks and it is surmonted by a statue representing the dormient soldier. The composition is completed by the podium and the War Stone.

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Chester Terrace

The site comprises a semi-detached pair of grade I listed stucco grand palace-style houses by Nash dating from 1825 at the entrance to Chester Terrace within Regents Park Conservation Area. The project involved amalgamating two dwellings to form one family residence inclusive of a single storey basement extension within the grounds of the garden. 

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Downshire Hill

The house was built circa 1818 and was a typical product of the Regency period in its external appearance, plan and decoration.  The building forms part of an irregular and picturesque development of houses all more or less of the same date but varying in appearance within the Hampstead Conservation Area and Downshire Hill.

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Emery House

This London property is a small unlisted two storey detached Victorian cottage built in the mid 1870’s and located in a large, secluded and private plot within The Mall Conservation Area. The house has been used historically as an artist’s studio and by boat builders, latterly it was lived in by a retired couple and a range of garages were rented out for storage.

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Hampstead Synagogue Grade II*

The Grade II* listed Hampstead Synagogue was built in 1892 by architect Delissa Joseph, and was originally used as a place of worship for the largest Jewish population in London. The front, of high significance, is the only elevation that can be seen on this landlocked site.  The interior is important for fittings that express its rituals and also the use and expression of its space.

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South Quay, Hayle

The grade II listed South Quay, along with Carnsew Pool, is located in the centre of Hayle, Cornwall.  Hayle was the only port serving the mining industry and thrived on the export of copper, tin and heavy industrial machinery to locations around the world. Since the decline of the industries, South Quay has lain derelict since the 1970s.

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